OOS 36 - Advancing Science to Conserve Species Threatened By Disease

Friday, August 12, 2016: 8:00 AM-11:30 AM
Grand Floridian Blrm A, Ft Lauderdale Convention Center
Organizer:
Kate E. Langwig
Co-organizers:
A. Marm Kilpatrick and Joseph Hoyt
Moderator:
Kate E. Langwig
Transforming science into policy is a key challenge in ecology in the Anthropocene. Infectious diseases are increasingly recognized as a significant threat to many species of wildlife, and despite over a century of successful management of human diseases, there is limited advancement of ecological research to management action for wildlife infectious disease. This is in part due to relatively recent recognition of the importance of wildlife emerging infectious disease within ecosystems. Disease can drive abundant species to rarity or extinction, alter community composition, and change the functioning of whole systems. Despite the importance of disease as a threat to wildlife, translating the science of disease ecology into management action has been a significant challenge for conserving species. In this session, speakers will synthesize theoretical and empirical studies from diverse systems to address how to better manage the threat of wildlife disease. We hope the OOS will result in a framework for moving beyond the science of disease to better apply our knowledge to conserve species at risk.
8:00 AM
 Bighorn sheep pneumonia driving species decline: Developing an evidence base to manage infectious disease in wildlife
Raina K. Plowright, Montana State University; Frances Cassirer, Idaho Dept. of Fish and Game; Thomas E Besser, Washington State University College of Veterinary Medicine; Kezia Manlove, Penn State University; Emily Almberg, Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks; Paul Chafee Cross, US Geological Survey; Peter J. Hudson, Penn State University
8:20 AM
 Dynamics and impacts of sarcoptic mange in the wolves of Yellowstone National Park
Emily Almberg, Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks; Paul C. Cross, US Geological Survey; Andrew P. Dobson, Princeton University; Douglas W. Smith, Yellowstone Center for Resources; Daniel R. Stahler, Yellowstone Center for Resources; Peter J. Hudson, Penn State University
8:40 AM
 Managing devil-facial tumour disease to prevent extinction
Hamish I. McCallum, Griffith University
9:00 AM
 Managing marine diseases despite large knowledge gaps: A case study of epizootic shell disease in the American lobster
Maya L. Groner, Virginia Institute of Marine Science; C. Drew Harvell, Cornell University; John M. Hoenig, Virginia Institute of Marine Science; Donald F Landers, Dominion Resources; Jeff Maynard, Laboratoire d’Excellence “CORAIL”; Jeffrey D. Shields, Virginia Institute of Marine Science
9:20 AM
 The science of brucellosis management in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem
Paul Chafee Cross, US Geological Survey; Brandon M. Scurlock, Wyoming Game and Fish Department; William H. Edwards, Wyoming Game and Fish Department; Justin Gude, Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks; P.J. White, National Park Service; John Treanor, National Park Service; Rick Wallen, National Park Service; Angela Brennan, Montana State University; Mark Drew, Idaho Fish and Game Department; Gordon Luikart, The University of Montana; Jeff T. Foster, University of New Hampshire; Pauline Kamath, U.S. Geological Survey; Jerod A. Merkle, University of Wyoming; Eric Maichak, Wyoming Game and Fish Department; Kelly Proffitt, Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks; Arthur D. Middleton, Yale University; Suelee Robbe-Austerman, USDA APHIS VS NVSL; Matthew J. Kauffman, United States Geological Survey, Wyoming Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit; Jack Rhyan, USDA
9:40 AM
9:50 AM
 Sylvatic plague as a threat to ecosystems of western North America
Dean E. Biggins, US Geological Survey; Marc R. Matchett, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; David A. Eads, US Geological Survey; Tonie E. Rocke, US Geological Survey; Shantini Ramakrishnan, Denver Zoological Foundation; Amanda R. Goldberg, University of Idaho; Travis M. Livieri, Prairie Wildlife Research; Jerry L. Godbey, US Geological Survey; Judy L. Williamson, US Geological Survey; Brian J. Miller, Denver Zoological Foundation; Jeffrey Wimsatt, West Virginia University
10:10 AM
 Management of species threatened by disease: Balancing short-term goals with impacts on evolutionary rescue
A. Marm Kilpatrick, University of California, Santa Cruz; Kate E. Langwig, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; Joseph Hoyt, University of California, Santa Cruz; Winifred F. Frick, University of California, Santa Cruz; Jeff T. Foster, University of New Hampshire; Tina L. Cheng, University of California, Santa Cruz
10:30 AM
 Insights from endemic regions for managing wildlife infectious disease
Joseph Hoyt, University of California, Santa Cruz; Kate E. Langwig, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; Jeff T. Foster, University of New Hampshire; Winifred F. Frick, University of California, Santa Cruz; A. Marm Kilpatrick, University of California, Santa Cruz
10:50 AM
 Evaluating strategies to protect amphibian populations from disease-induced extinction
Cheryl J. Briggs, University of California, Santa Barbara; Brian Drawert, University of California Santa Barbara; Marc Griesemer, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Linda Petzold, University of California Santa Barbara
11:10 AM
 Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans: A novel and deadly threat to amphibian conservation
An Martel, University of Ghent; Frank Pasmans, Ghent University