OOS 82
Terrestrial Carbon Cycle and Nonautonomous Systems

Friday, August 14, 2015: 8:00 AM-11:30 AM
310, Baltimore Convention Center
Organizer:
Yiqi Luo
Co-organizer:
Alan Hastings
Moderator:
Kathe Todd-Brown
Modern civilization of humanity is largely driven by uses of fossil fuel energy. However, fossil fuel burning releases carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, likely inducing global warming. The latter, in turn, poses a great threat to the human civilization. To sustain humanity into future generations, we have to improve our understanding of carbon cycles in biosphere, atmosphere, and lithosphere in the Earth system. Carbon cycle research has been primarily done by use of observations through various networks, field and laboratory experiments, and simulation models. Observations characterize regional and global patterns of carbon cycle components on the Earth. Experimental studies directly probe responses of ecosystems to global change. The modeling community has incorporated more and more processes into Earth system models. As a consequence, the Earth system models become increasingly complex and less tractable. Overall, the existing approaches have not led to well-constrained predictions of the terrestrial carbon cycle. It is essential to explore other approaches to study global carbon cycle. Recent research has examined several lines of empirical evidence to show that the terrestrial carbon cycle can be described as a nonautonomous system. That is, the carbon cycle can be expressed by a set of differential equations with their coefficients being modified by nonlinear response functions to external forcing. We have formed a working group, supported by NSF National Institute of Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) over the past three years, to study the nonautonomous system of the terrestrial carbon cycle. The NIMBioS working group consists of seven mathematicians and seven ecologists. The group has explored a variety of carbon cycle issues using interdisciplinary approaches. The proposed organized oral session (OOS) will present eight talks, seven of which directly stem from research by the working group. To make this symposium broadly interesting to a wide audience, we will have one introductory talk on ecological and mathematical properties of the terrestrial carbon cycle and one introductory talk on nonautonomous systems with applications in ecology. One talk will review applications of the nonautonomous systems theory to different ecological applications. Then we will have two more ecology-oriented talks on mathematical behaviors of nonlinear microbial models and parameter space of carbon cycle models, respectively. Two math-oriented talks are on global attractors and convergences of the nonautonomous carbon cycle systems and residence times of transient pool-flux systems, respectively. One talk is to examine tropical forest dynamics under the nonautonomous systems framework
8:20 AM
 Nonautonomous systems: Mathematical properties and ecological applications
Ying Wang, University of Oklahoma Norman Campus; Yiqi Luo, University of Oklahoma; Alan Hastings, University of California, Davis; Martin Rasmussen, Imperial College London; Yingping Wang, CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research
8:40 AM
 General applications of nonautonomous system theory to ecological research
Jiang Jiang, University of Tennessee; Yiqi Luo, University of Oklahoma; Alan Hastings, University of California, Davis
9:00 AM
 Residence time and turnover times in a changing environment
Alan Hastings, University of California, Davis; Martin Rasmussen, Imperial College London; Ying Wang, University of Oklahoma Norman Campus; Yiqi Luo, University of Oklahoma
9:20 AM
 Explaining the sources of variation in CMIP5 models by fitting reduced complexity models to their simulation outputs
Forrest M. Hoffman, University of California; Matthew Smith, Microsoft Research; Katherine Todd-Brown, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Yiqi Luo, University of Oklahoma; Yingping Wang, CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research
9:40 AM
9:50 AM
 Diagnosing the uncertainty of Earth system models using a traceability framework
Junyi Liang, University of Oklahoma; Lifen Jiang, University of Oklahoma; Jianyang Xia, University of Oklahoma; Ying Wang, University of Oklahoma; Yiqi Luo, University of Oklahoma
10:10 AM
 What determines the sensitivities of the simulated soil carbon to warming and substrate priming in three different soil carbon models?
Yingping Wang, CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research; Jiang Jiang, University of Tennessee; Benito Chen-Charpentier, University of Texas at Arlington; Fola B. Agusto, Austin Peay State University; Alan Hastings, University of California, Davis; Forrest M. Hoffman, Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Martin Rasmussen, Imperial College London; Katherine Todd-Brown, University of Oklahoma; Matthew Smith, Microsoft Research; Ying Wang, University of Oklahoma; Xia Xu, Iowa State University of Science and Technology; Yiqi Luo, University of Oklahoma
10:30 AM
 A general mathematical framework for representing soil organic matter dynamics as a non-autonomus system
Carlos A. Sierra, Max-Planck-Institute for Biogeochemistry; Markus Mueller, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry
10:50 AM
 Uncertainty of net primary productivity and net ecosystem productivity of terrestrial ecosystems in China
Junjiong Shao, East China Normal University; Xuhui Zhou, East China Normal University
11:10 AM
 Carbon flux and biological monitoring at the Baltimore Cub Hill flux tower: Partitioning the role of land use, carbon emissions and respiration
John Hom, USDA Forest Service; Nicanor Saliendra, USDA; Matthew Patterson, USDA Forest Service; Ian D. Yesilonis, U.S. Forest Service; Rodrigo Vargas, University of Delaware; Kenneth L. Clark, USDA Forest Service; Leonard Bielory, Rutgers University